El desafío para la Industria del Caballo en la Argentina es nuevamente
"Trabajar en forma INTEGRADA, HACIENDO QUE LAS COSAS PASEN"
Este año ¿lo lograremos?
Mario López Oliva

viernes, 28 de octubre de 2011

Caballos y Opinión 2011 Conferencias Online "Experiencia profesional de un veterinario argentino en los países árabes"


  Disertante: Dr. Alejandro Echezarreta
El Dr. Alejandro Echezarreta se dedica a la  medicina equina desde el año 1999. Su actividad se ha desarrollado principalmente en caballos de Salto y Endurance. Actualmente se encuentra trabajando en Abu Dhabi, Emiratos Árabes Unidos, para Al Wathba Stables con caballos de Endurance y Árabes de Carrera. Se dedica a todos los aspectos de la salud del caballo deportivo, principalmente claudicaciones y diagnóstico por imágenes (Ecografía y Radiología).
Día: lunes 31 de octubre a las 12 hs Argentina   7 PM Abu Dhabi, EAU
Arancel: gratis
Organiza  Caballos y Opinion
M.V. Mario Lopez Oliva mlopezoliva@gmail.com
Blog sobre la Industria Hípica http://caballoslomejoresopinar.blogspot.com/
Caballos y Opinión http://caballosyopinion.com
Radio Caballos y Opinión http://www.blogtalkradio.com/caballoslomejoresopinar
 
Sigan sus sueños Follow your dreams

Triples y Cuádruples coronados del Turf Argentino Disertante, Sr. Marcelo Febula

martes, 25 de octubre de 2011

Horses and Jetlag. Dr. Domingo Tortonese



Interview by Dr. Julio Oriol

Dr. Domingo Tortoneses,

Ph.D. (Reproductive Physiology, Endocrinology). 1991. West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. (1987 - 1991). GPA: 3.8 (out of 4).

D.V.Sc




. (Doctor of Veterinary Sciences; Genetics of Reproduction). 1986. National University of La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. (1982 - 1986). Mark 10 (out of 10).

D.V.M. (Médico Veterinario - Veterinary Surgeon). 1980. National University of La Plata,
La PLata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. (1975 - 1980).

First Certificate in English. 1976. University of Cambridge, UK. (1970 - 1976).

Bachiller Nacional (Baccalaureate Diploma). 1974. Colegio San Luis, H.H. Maristas, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Mar. 1970 - Nov. 1974).


PRESENT APPOINTMENT

Senior Lecturer. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. 2004 - present.

lunes, 24 de octubre de 2011

Actualidad del Endurance Dr Luis Flores

Presentacion de Anemia Infecciosa Equina por Dra. Cecilia Galosi

Morfología raza Criolla, Argentina Dr. Luis Flores

Light dependency underlies beneficial jetlag in racehorses


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
17 October 2011
A new study shows that racehorses are extremely sensitive to changes in daily light and, contrary to humans, can adapt very quickly to sudden shifts in the 24-hour light­¾dark cycle, such as those resulting from a transmeridian flight, with unexpected benefits on their physical performance.
            The research led by academics in the University of Bristol’s Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences is published in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology.
This is the first study of its kind to investigate the effects of jetlag on the physiology and performance of racehorses under tightly controlled experimental conditions.  Horses are the only athletes, apart from humans, regularly flown across time zones for athletic competitions.
Dr Domingo Tortonese, Senior Lecturer in Anatomy in the University’s School of Veterinary Sciences, who led the study, said: “We tested the hypothesis that abrupt alterations in the 24-hour light¾dark cycle, such as those associated with the crossing of time-zones, would alter the molecular clockwork and neuroendocrine systems of racehorses with detrimental consequences on their athletic performance.
In humans, air travel-associated sudden changes in the 24-hour light¾dark cycle disrupt biological rhythms with negative effects on cognitive and physical performance.  Indeed, jetlag has important implications for athletes who travel across time zones for competitive sporting events, particularly after an easterly flight.
“Our study shows that racehorses are different from humans in that they rely on light cues for their daily rhythms of activity, rather than for the synchronisation of an endogenously generated rhythm to the 24-hour light¾dark cycle.  This light dependency underlies a rapid process of adaptation with critical scientific implications and unexpected practical benefits.”
Thoroughbred horses with previous race training were housed in light-controlled rooms and put through a fitness program of daily sessions of exercise on a high–speed treadmill at variable times of the day for three months.  They then experienced a shift in the 24-hour light¾dark cycle that mimicked an easterly flight across seven time zones.
The 24-hour patterns of four clock genes, together with neuroendocrine systems involved in a variety of functions, including time measurement, homeostasis and the response to stress, were investigated before and after the shift.  The aerobic and anaerobic capacities were measured by standardised performance tests. Locomotor activity was also assessed continuously, under photoperiodic conditions and in the absence of light cues (constant darkness), to determine the expression and robustness of a 24-hour rest¾activity cycle. The speed of re-adaptation to a new light¾dark cycle was also investigated. 
Contrary to the prediction based on human and rodent data, the results show that whereas horses are extremely sensitive to sudden changes in the 24-hour light¾dark cycle, they can adapt very quickly to a phase shift. Importantly, this rapid adaptation is not accompanied by an increase in the level of stress, but by alterations in endocrine systems that favour an enhancement of the horse’s physical capacity during the process.
The improvement in athletic performance following experimental jetlag resulted in the animals being able to run at full gallop for an additional 25 seconds before reaching fatigue.  This differs from humans who show a slow adjustment, particularly after an eastbound flight, with detrimental consequences on performance.  The difference between the two species can be attributed to the powerful masking effect of light on the horse’s daily locomotor activity, which, together with the absence of a robust sleep¾wake cycle, can be a part of a mechanism of adaptation to sudden changes in the environment.
The results of this study have important practical implications, since equine athletes do not need to travel to be subjected to changes in daily light, and its beneficial consequences could help to reduce the level of injury in competitions.
This research by the University of Bristol in collaboration with academics from the University of Melbourne and the University of Cambridge was supported by a research grant from the Horserace Betting Levy Board and by a Wellcome Trust Equipment Grant.
The paper: Experimental jetlag disrupts circadian clock genes but improves performance in racehorses after light-dependent rapid resetting of neuroendocrine systems and the rest-activity cycle, Tortonese D J, Preedy D F, Hesketh S A, Webb H N, Wilkinson E S, Allen W R, Fuller C J, Townsend J, Short R V.  Journal of Neuroendocrinol, published online ahead of print, 15 September 2011. 
. . . ENDS
Issued by the Public Relations Office, Communications & Marketing Services, University of Bristol, tel (0117) 331 7276, mobile 07747 768805.  Contact: Joanne Fryer.

La Industria del Caballo Horse Industry Online Radio by Caballos y Opinion | Blog Talk Radio

Jet lag benefits racehorses

http://www.equinescienceupdate.com/articles/jlbr.html



A new study has shown that not only do racehorses cope better with jetlag than humans do, but also their performance even appears to be enhanced by it.


The research, led by academics in the University of Bristol’s Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Melbourne and the University of Cambridge, is published in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology.

Do horses suffer from jetlag?
Jet lag benefits racehorses
Jet lag is a phenomenon encountered by long-distance travellers.  However, it is not just the length of the journey that is important. The significant factor is the rapid crossing
Report by Mark Andrews. Published on line 21.10.11




One of the horses used in the studies
during a performance test. Photo © Dr Domingo Tortonese / University of Bristol. Reproduction not  permitted without consent.
of multiple time zones.  So flying from California to the UK would have (in principle) more negative effects than flying from New York. This is certainly the case for humans. Jet lag is due to the conflict between the new cycle of light and dark and the body’s natural circadian (literally “about a day“) rhythm.


Symptoms of jetlag in humans include disturbed sleep patterns, loss of appetite, lack of concentration and lethargy. Human athletes have noticed that jetlag can impair performance. So they take time to adapt to conditions in the country where the competition is to be held.


But what about horses? This new study is the first of its kind to investigate the effects of jetlag on the physiology and performance of racehorses under tightly controlled experimental conditions.  Horses are the only athletes, apart from humans, regularly flown across time zones for athletic competitions.


Dr Domingo Tortonese, Senior Lecturer in Anatomy in the School of Veterinary Sciences, who led the study, said: “We tested the hypothesis that abrupt alterations in the 24-hour light-dark cycle, such as those associated with the crossing of time-zones, would alter the molecular clockwork and neuroendocrine systems of racehorses with detrimental consequences on their athletic performance.


“In humans, air travel-associated sudden changes in the 24-hour light-dark cycle disrupt biological rhythms with negative effects on cognitive and physical performance.  Indeed, jetlag has important implications for athletes who travel across time zones for competitive sporting events, particularly after an easterly flight.


“Our study shows that racehorses are different from humans in that they rely on light cues for their daily rhythms of activity, rather than for the synchronisation of an endogenously generated rhythm to the 24-hour light-dark cycle. This light dependency underlies a rapid process of adaptation with critical scientific implications and unexpected practical benefits.”


The research team took seven Thoroughbred horses with previous race training and put them through a fitness program of daily sessions of exercise on a high–speed treadmill at variable times of the day for three months. Throughout the study, the horses were kept in a light-controlled environment. The researchers then altered the lighting to mimic a sudden change in time zones - the equivalent of an easterly flight across seven time zones.


They found that the horses adapted very quickly to a shift in time zone. Importantly, this rapid adaptation was not accompanied by an increase in the level of stress, but by alterations in endocrine systems that favoured an enhancement of the horse’s physical capacity during the process.


In fact, following experimental jetlag, horses experienced improved athletic performance, being able to run at full gallop for an additional 25 seconds before reaching fatigue. The treadmill velocity at which blood lactate reached 4mmol/l was also significantly increased after the change in photoperiod.


This improved performance did not persist, however, and had returned to pre-shift values after 14 days in the new lighting conditions.


The researchers suggest that these findings have important practical implications, since equine athletes do not need to travel to be subjected to changes in daily light. Its beneficial consequences could help to reduce the level of injury in competitions.


The research was supported by a research grant from the Horserace Betting Levy Board and by a Wellcome Trust Equipment Grant.






For more details see: Experimental jetlag disrupts circadian clock genes but improves performance in racehorses after light-dependent rapid resetting of neuroendocrine systems and the rest-activity cycle, DJ Tortonese, DF Preedy, SA Hesketh, HN Webb, ES Wilkinson, WR Allen, CJ Fuller, J Townsend, RV Short. 
Journal of Neuroendocrinology, published online ahead of print, 15 September 2011.
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2826.2011.02222.x

domingo, 23 de octubre de 2011

PASAPORTE MEXICANO SANITARIO Y DE IDENTIFICACION DE CABALLOS DE DEPORTE Y ESPECTACULOS MEXICANO:SAGARPA-SENASICA DE MEXICO ANULA EL REQUISITO DE LA PRUEBA DE COGGINS PARA DIAGNOSTICO NEGATIVO O LIBRE DE ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA DEL PASAPORTE EQUINO SANITARIO NACIONAL MEXICANO.


Dr. Jorge Murga
Publicado con fecha del 2 de Septiembre de 2011 ,en el Diario oficial de la Federacion, con el texto: " Francisco Javier Mayorga,Secretario de SAGARPA.                                                                                                 Considerando que SENASICA (de México) cuenta con evidencia de que la ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA es una enfermedad viríca crónica, exclusiva de los équidos (caballos, burros y mulas*) y transmitida habitualmente por artrópodos (también por inyectologia  empirica*),caracterizada por crisis hemoliticas febriles intermitentes y la influenza o gripe equina,es de mortalidad nula si no se producen complicaciones  . *Que ambas enfermedades por sus caracteristicas de diseminación se previene con el cuidado sanitario que los caballos de deporte y espectaculo reciben, RAZON POR LA CUAL SU IMPACTO SANITARIO ES ESCASO A NULO EN ESTE TIPO DE CABALLOS."                     *EL AUTOR ESTA EN COMPLETO Y TOTAL DESACUERDO CON LOS TITULARES DE SAGARPA-SENASICA  DE MEXICO, FRANCISCO JAVIER MAYORGA y MVZ HUGO FRAGOSO,RESPECTIVAMENTE.                                                                                                 *NOTAS DEL AUTOR: Dr. J.A. Murga,MV.                                                                   En  replica a los CONSIDERANDOS del acuerdo oficial de SAGARPA-SENASICA de México, sus respectivos  titulares Francisco Javier Mayorga  y MVZ Hugo Fragoso Sanchez,manifiesto  mi criterio:                   1.-El acuerdo oficial de anulación del requisito semestral de prueba de Coggins con resultado negativo o libre de anemia, infecciosa equina del pasaporte sanitario y de identificación de caballos de deporte y espectáculos de SAGARPA-SENASICA de México, ocurre irónicamente en la conmemoración internacional  del   250o. aniversario de la profesión de medicina veterinaria mundial, con la fundacion de la primera escuela de medicina veterinaria en Lyon,  Francia  y   aniversario 168 del descubrimiento cíentifico de la anemia infecciosa equina en Francia. Las   repercursiones   nacionales e internacionales   para la industria  nacional mexicana del caballo ,incrementaran la imagen  de  México en posición de país de alto riesgo de contagio e infección de caballos internacionales y nacionales  por anemia infecciosa equina y piroplamosis.                                                                          2.-Las normas de epidemiologia /epizootiologia internacional de anemia infecciosa equina, establecen que las posibilidades ambientales de contagio de anemia infeciosa equina, pueden incrementarse exponencialmente hasta en número de un millón de veces, en regiones donde no se efectuan programas eficientes de   pruebas de Coggins o Elisa, para diagnóstico, identificación , control y/o eliminación de equidos positivos (enfermos) de anemia infecciosa equina.                                                                                                                       3.- México pierde anualmente millones de dólares por caballos de deporte y espectaculos , que nacieron en México libres de anemia infecciosa equina o caballos importados que ingresaron a territorio mexicano libres de anemia infecciosa equina y fueron infectados por condiciones ambientales mexicanas de contagio.La anemia infecciosa equina es una enfermedad mortal a corto,mediano o largo plazo, el virus causante es hermano del SIDA DE LOS HUMANOS, el  virus de AIE ataca a los globulos rojos y otros órganos y el virus de SIDA a los globulos blancos y el sistema inmunologico humano. NO HAY VACUNA PARA ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA, ES RESPONSABILIDAD INDELEGABLE DE SENASICA-SAGARPA DE MEXICO , DIRECCIONES DE GANADERIA DE TODOS LOS ESTADOS Y MEXICO D.F. , APOYO Y COOPERACION DE TODOS LOS INTEGRANTES DE LA INDUSTRIA NACIONAL MEXICANA DEL CABALLO,  el diagnóstico de laboratorio, identificación , control y  prevención de la anemia infecciosa equina en el todo el  territorio nacional, no únicamente exigir que los caballos de importación sean certificados mediante prueba de Coggins o Elisa,que estan libres de anemia infecciosa equina. El valor comercial de un équido enfermo de ANEMIA INFECIOSA EQUINA, es CERO como de pronóstico de peste apocalíptica  es la norma oficial de cancelar el requisito de la prueba de Coggins semestral  para diagnóstico negativo de anemia infecciosa equina del "pasaporte sanitario y de identificación de caballos de deporte y espectáculo" emitido con versión modificada en Septiembre de 2011.                                                                                                                          4.-Las estadisticas mexicanas reportan una poblacion  de 6,500,00 équidos (6 y medio millones), la capacidad de pruebas de diagnóstico de  pruebas de Coggins del laboratorio veterinario oficial Tecamac de Sagarpa-Senasica de México, es de 1,200 pruebas anuales, equivalentes al muestreo de 1 por cada 5,400 équidos de la población nacional de équidos mexicanos.                                                                             5.-El acuerdo de Sagarpa-Senasica de México, de anular el requisito de prueba de Coggins para AIE, del pasaporte equino esta en contraposición con las  normas de sanidad animal equina del Tratado de Libre Comercio con Estados Unidos y Canadá.EstadosUnidos efectúa 1,800, 000 (un millón 800,000) , pruebas anuales de Coggins o Elisa en mas de mil laboratorios oficiales federales, estatales, municipales, universitarios, privados en completa coordinación con el USDA-Departamento de Agricultura y Ganaderia de Estados Unidos y todos los profesionales médicos veterinarios  clínicos de equinos acreditados ante el USDA, para muestrear sangre y expedir certificados de movilización interestatal o exportación.Canadá esta libre de anemia infecciosa equina.                                                                  6.- Control de Anemia infecciosa equina en Argentina:Se efectuan un promedio anual de 400,000 pruebas anuales de Coggins para AIE y su norma de sanidad animal equina es validez bimestral de Coggins (dos meses) para movilizacion  interestatal de caballos de deportes o espectaculos, que predominantemente son caballos de polo, carreras y salto ecuestre. Los caballos argentinos de polo , carreras , salto y miniatura   son exportados a todo el mundo con  derrama de  cientos de millones de dolares a la economia de la industria nacional Argentina del caballo.                                                                                        Canadá, Chile, Uruguay , todos paises  nórdicos de Europa Occidental, Australia y Nueva Zelandia estan libres de anemia infecciosa equina .
7.-En primera y en todas las instancias la salud animal equina de anemia infecciosa equina, NO es responsabilidad única de SENSICA-SAGARPA de México, es responsabilidad de todos los integrantes de la industria nacional mexicana del caballo, industria veterinaria y profesionalmente   de los médicos veterinarios de equinos , en todas sus modalidades y capacidades. Mi desacuerdo con los criterios de los titulares de SAGARPA-SENASICA de México, Francisco Javier Mayorga y MVZ Hugo Fragoso,  debe de interpretarse como un aliado profesional y amigo, que expresa  criterios constructivos para que la industria nacional mexicana del caballo, recupere su potencial de derrama economica nacional e internacional  en todos sus modalidades de funciones zootécnicas y actividades economicas con raices en el beneficio de derrama de trabajo y producción para el campo mexicano.                                                                                                      8.-Plan  de salud equina nacional para enfermedades equinas cuarentenarias internacionales: Anemia Infecciosa Equina, piroplasmosis equina , encefalitis equinas virales y enfermedades equinas prevenibles  en México:En el 2012 el suscrito, publicará una convocatoria para disertar en un foro nacional de médicos veterinarios nacionales e internacionales, oficiales y no oficiales que deseen dialogar y  apoyar  con criterios constructivos a la industria nacional mexicana del caballo e industria veterinaria , a la sanidad equina nacional  y autoridades de sanidad equina de  SAGARPA-SENASICA DE MEXICO.                                                                                                                 9.-En México la situación actual y de siempre es que la ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA, esta sin control en todo el territorio nacional e incrementandose el número de équidos enfermos y reactores positivos a ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA , por las razones  expuestas y las consecuencias de su epizootiologia  a corto, mediano y largo plazo.                10.-La situacion endémica de la ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA en toda  la República Mexicana, representa miles de focos de contagio e infección , en un radio de 200 metros de cualquier équido enfermo de ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA o reactor positivo , presente en sitios de concentración  de équidos para deportes y  espectaculos  ecuestres, subastas, cabalgatas , praderas, habitat natural de équidos, carriles de carreras de caballos , etc.             
 Dr. Jorge Augusto  Murga,MV:                                                                         Presidente fundador emérito y Director de Educación Continua de la    de la  Asociación Mexicana de Médicos Veterinarios Dentistas de Equinos "Pro-salud de la boca y dentadura del équido:5o. pie del caballo"                                                                                                           Corresponsal internacional de Revista " a caballo" de México, D.F.  www.caballosyopinion.com de Buenos Aires, Argentina                              www.dameopaso.com.ve de Caracas,Venezuela.                                         Sección de Equinos  de Editorial Eco-reli, Estado de México.                   Asesor emérito del programa del Caballo Warmblood Nacional del Ejército Mexicano.
jorgemurga@sbcglobal.net

jueves, 20 de octubre de 2011

Student Testimonials, Equine Gnathological Training Institute, Inc.


October 19, 2011
From: King Hill, Idaho 83633, USA
Link:  http://www.equinedentistry.net/
New Beginnings
By Simon Gunson
Where do i begin? Dale and Bert are two of the nicest and most knowledgeable people that you could ever wish to meet.
My mum started off my riding and has stuck by me ever since. I got my first pony when i was 8 years old and I'm 19 now. Mum, so far, has always found me nice ponies and horses, a good set of riding instructors and has always been there to help. The support from her has helped me get to be a fairly high standard of rider with flatwork and showjumping.
Having a very good dentist, Paul Waudby, and a good idea of how a horse should go on the flat, i was able to feel the phenomenal difference between what Paul had done in comparison to the dentist we had previous to him.
I was fascinated by what Paul was doing and wanted to learn more. He kindly let me travel with him on his rounds, whilst he was in the area and it fuelled my thirst to find out more. Paul suggested coming out to the school that Dale and Bert set up and so i gave Dale a call. Dale asked about why i wanted to go into dentistry, what experience i had with handling horses, how long i had been around them and signed me up for the course.
Just over a month later, i was jetting off to America, not really knowing what to expect! When i arrived in Boise, Dale picked me up and dropped me off at one of the exquisite houses that are used to house the students. The next day, Dale and Bert showed the class round the museum and factory at World Wide Equine Inc. the first week was devoted to learning the theory of equine dentistry. Looking at the history of dentistry, the anatomy of a horse's  head, aging a horse, the principles of balance and equilibration, performance and instrumentation. The class text was "Oral Health in Equidae" By Dale Jeffrey. It's an amazing book that covers more or less everything and anything that maybe wasn't in there or we didn't understand fully, Dale and Bert were there to explain to us in a way that we could understand. Each night i would read over what the class had been learning and if i was stuck on something, i would bring it up in class the next day.
Week 2 was purely practical and hands on. Horses were arranged for each day and with only 3 of us, there were more than enough for us to be getting on with. With the small amount of the people that were on the course, it meant that we got 1 on 1 tutoring. The further through the week and the easier we were finding it, the more they left us to do as much as we could before they came gave us advice or help. Before i left to go home, Bert very kindly said that i could travel round with him after the next course in October. When i got back in England, the first thing i did was book flights for October. i kept myself ticking over, making sure everything stayed fresh in my mind and started building a client base.
I couldn't wait to come back out again, the few days before i was due to fly out, i could barely sleep! The course took the same path as it did last time and i built on the knowledge that i got from the last course. Through both weeks i learned more on top of what i learned the first time round. Everything seemed a lot easier.
I am currently going round with Bert and learning from one of the best!
Dental Issues
By Carla Adams
My name is Carla Adams.  I'll start with a little of my background.
I practically grew up on the back of a horse.  I won my first blue ribbon in the show ring at the age of 3, trained my first horse from start to finish with just a little help from my dad at the age of nine.  I've ridden everything from English pleasure horses to racing Quarter Horses, so you would think I would know something about horses' teeth.
This class has taught me that other than wolf teeth need to come out and if a horse is losing feed he may need his teeth worked on, I knew very little about them and the problems they could cause.  I walk away from class today with a new respect and knowledge of equine gnathological processes.
Floating a horses teeth will never again be defined as making teeth level, but to make the horses teeth come together in matching parallel biomechanical planes of occlusion.  This allows proper mastication and utilization of food for weight gain and energy.
I now know what a bit seat is which I had never heard of before and how something as simple as giving the bit a proper place to rest can be greatly beneficial to horses and riders.  Rolling in a bit seat is not as simple as it looks.
Issues you may encounter while training may not be an issue with your methods or the horses unwillingness to work but a problem with teeth, bone structure or the temporomandibular joint.
Lastly, upon graduation from this class I leave with a far greater knowledge of gnathology than I arrived with, and yet it is only the tip of the ice berg.
What I Have Learned
By Karl Willson Brough
Hi, my name is Karl Brough, I was born in Pocatello, Idaho.  I am 25 years old, learning how to become an Equine Gnathological Practitioner.  The practice of gnathology helps provide prophylaxis and equilibration to horses' teeth achieving matching parallel biomechanical planes of occlusion for cheek teeth and incisors.  Efficient mastication and occlusion patterns enhance the processes of deglutition and nutrition.  I believe in relieving horses' pain by correcting dental complications.  After prophylaxis you should see optimistic changes in temperament, performance, diet, and overall health, all things that give you a rewarding feeling knowing you have helped these beautiful animals.
If you do not have the right knowledge and technique working on horses teeth can be very challenging.  Not only have I been learning gnathological practices, I have been learning horse handling procedures from Dale and Bert.  I am grateful they have the compassion to teach me how to help horses and find the best solutions to help them with their teeth.  They encourage me to keep moving forward with my work and technique.

lunes, 17 de octubre de 2011

lunes, 10 de octubre de 2011

Industria Hipica Argentina algunos datos

Conferencias Online / Online Conference Esta semana 3 conferencias / 3 conferences this week

"Equine Gnathological Training Institute Conference"
Equine Gnathology Defined: Equine gnathology is the study of masticatory systems, including their physiology, functional disturbances, and treatment.  Gnathology is doing extremely accurate prophylaxis and equilibration, verifying the work as it progresses, applying all well founded gnathological principles, and rechecking the work continually.  The heart of equine gnathology revolves around efficient comfortable mastication and optimum performance.
Conference/School
Motto:  
We believe in helping the horses of the world by teaching time tested gnathological methods to the people who love and care for them.
Speakers  
Dale Jeffrey  Instructor
                   Bert Lambert   Instructor

                           Randy Harney DVM   Attending  Veterinarian

                           Karl Brough                Student

                           Simon Gunson            Student

                            Carla Adams               Student 

                                   Kenny Kimball           Horse Owner

                                    Mary Kimball             Horse
Owner
Chairman: Dr. Jorge Murga
Día
/ Day: martes 11 de octubre a las 17 hs, Argentina. Tuesday 11th 
5 PM Argentina
Arancel / Fee: gratis / free
Idioma / language: ingles / english
Organiza  Caballos y Opinion

viernes, 7 de octubre de 2011

Carencias minerales en los potrillos de recría



Apenas 250 años

Conferencias Online 
"Apenas 250  años"
Historia de la Veterinaria como ciencia a través de los años.
Disertante: Dr. Ricardo Vecchio
El Dr.  Ricardo Vecchio además de médico veterinario es historiador en lo referente al desarrollo de la profesión veterinaria y la sanidad animal.
Día: miércoles 12 de octubre a las 17 hs, Argentina
Arancel: gratis
Organiza  Caballos y Opinion

domingo, 2 de octubre de 2011

Presentación del libro "El Turf en la sangre"

  Disertante: Sr. Luis Monti

Luis Monti es periodista de Turf en la provincia de Tucumán trabajó en los diarios La Gaceta, El Pueblo, Siglo XXI y El Siglo. Fue redactor de las revistas de Turf El Disco y La Clásica.

Día: martes 4 de octubre a las 21.30 hs Argentina

Lugar: http://www.wiziq.com/online-class/624397-el-turf-en-la-sangre
 
Instructivo para ingresar al aula virtual: Al cliquear en el link que le llegó en el mail pueden ingresar a una pagina donde están todos los datos de la Conferencia ahí deben cliquear en el botón que dice join the class, esto los llevará a una pagina donde hay un botón que dice launch class cliquear eso los llevara a otra pagina donde les pedirá un nombre (nombre solo o apellido solo o nombre y apellido sin dejar espacio entre los dos) para identificarse en el aula luego pulsar el botón launch the class esta acción aparecerá un botón que dice allow (permitir) hay que cliquear ahí eso les va a habilitar el audio. A los pocos segundos o entran a aula virtual si esta esta abierta o sale un cartel diciendo cuanto falta para el comienzo de la conferencia. A partir de acá al comenzar la conferencia se abre automáticamente
Para evitar cualquier problema acceda a la clase 10 o 15 minutos antes del comienzo

Conferencia grabada a su disposicion
Ciclo: Los paradigmas del Turf Argentino, El recambio generacional, ¿existe?" Disertante: Sr. Gustavo López, Dr. Ivan Pavlovsky, Sr. Luciano Zylber. Gustavo López es propietario del portal Los Pingos Ivan Pavlovsky es veterinario radicado en Dubai, Emiratos Arabes. Trabaja como asistant trainer en el Stud Satelite de Satish Seemar, entrenador de Sheik Mohamed al Maktoum, en el Millennium Stables, que es propiedad de Sheik Rashid, hijo mayor de Sheik Mohamed, Luciano Zylber es encargado de Marketing y Ventas del Haras La Leyend
Lugar: http://www.wiziq.com/online-class/623651-recambio-generacional

Caballos y Opinion. Video News

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Racehorses get jet lag when traveling?

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